Changing places at Wembley

Wembley Stadium is now even more accessible to all, at all levels….

The National Stadium has opened its new Changing Places toilet, ensuring it can accommodate every visitor’s personal hygiene needs.

With equipment supplied and installed by Clos-o-Mat, the UK’s leading disabled toileting solutions provider, the facility is the result of consultation with Level Playing Field and Attitude is All, who campaign for optimum accessibility for disabled sports and music fans.

Conveniently located on Level 1 internal concourse Block 104, the Stadium’s Changing Places toilet provides more space than a standard ‘disabled’ toilet, and additional equipment of a height adjustable adult-sized changing bench, a height adjustable wash basin, hoist, peninsular toilet and privacy screen.

“Over 2.5m people visit Wembley Stadium each year, 1 in 6 of the British population is disabled, so it is vital that, as a national venue, we provide appropriate facilities for everyone,” explained Wembley Stadium senior operations manager Peter Swordy.

“We did have a similar hygiene room, but it was small and it and the equipment was not felt to be adequate. The new Changing Places toilet is the result of two existing toilets being integrated into one, giving the space for a wheelchair user and their carer to manoeuvre easily, and appropriate equipment for their toileting needs.”

Under the 2013 version of Building Regulations Approved Document M, it is now ‘desirable’ for public buildings to include a hygiene room or Changing Places toilet; it is also ‘good practice’ under BS8300:2009.

Clos-o-Mat has a proven track record on the supply and installation of fully accessible toilets, including a substantial number of Changing Places facilities. Its ability to deliver design advice, supply, installation, commissioning and maintenance across the ambit of accessible toileting equipment, including the Clos-o-Mat wash and dry (automatic) toilet, means it is uniquely positioned to simplify the whole process for forward-thinking environments to which the public have access.